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Where Are The Top Ten Most Expensive Average House Prices in Alberta Canada?

26 Jun Posted by in Statistics | Comments

alberta-tourist mapAccording to information provided by the Alberta Government, the following are the top 10 cities, towns or villages with the highest average priced homes.

It is no mystery that the these Towns and Cities are nearly all located in Southern Alberta.  Alberta’s northern cities have industries focused primarily on blue collar and agricultural business, whereas southern Alberta is focused on higher paying white collar positions.   Calgary, for instance, is second only to Toronto in the number of head offices it is home to.  Transportation giants like an CP Rail, oil heavy weights like Cenovus (I hope you like the Cenovus ‘heavy weight’ oil industry reference) and media titans like Shaw Communications all call the Calgary area home.

The prices below are calculated by taking the amount assessed for all of the homes divided by the total number of homes.  The data is from 2014.

sping-lake-alberta10. Spring Lake – $296,400 –

The village of Spring Lake has just 302 homes and is situated just 40 kilometres west of Edmonton.   Spring Lake has the 104th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.  It was originally called Edmonton Beach.

9. Cochrane Lake – $301,036 –

Cochrane lake is just north west of the city of Calgary.  It has 10,276 homes.  Cochrane has the 105th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.

okotoks-sign8. Okotoks – $326,290 –

Okotoks is just south of the city of Calgary (you may notice a trend) and boasts 10,846 homes.  Okotoks has the 124th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.

7. Beaumont – $348,154 –

Beaumont is situated just south of the city of Edmonton.  It was originally a French farming community.  Beaumont has the 153th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.The town of Beaumont are 5,823 homes.

6. St. Albert – $359,313 –

Originally settled as a Metis community, St. Albert is on the north west edge of the City of Edmonton.  St Albert has the 204th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.The city of St. Albert has 25,040 homes.

calgary-downtown5. Calgary – $361,146 –

The City of Calgary is the largest city in Alberta.  It was home to the 1988 winter Olympics and is considering a bid for the 2026 Olympics.  Calgary has the 74th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.  It has 478,223 homes.

4. Alberta Beach – $363,742 –

The small village of Alberta beach has a mere 440 homes on the edge of Lac Ste. Anne.  Alberta Beach has the 120th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province.

3. Banff – $370,569 –

World famous Banff is a town of just 3,346 homes in Banff National Park.  Banff has the 60th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province. It is located in the Rocky Mountains range west of the City of Calgary.

chestermere-john-peake-park2. Chestermere – $444,414 –

The City of Chestermere was the fasted growing municipality in the province of Alberta and has been for many years.  It is the only lake community in southern Alberta that allows motorized watercraft on it’s 750 acre lake and has many beautiful high end luxury homes.  Chestermere has the 136th highest taxes out of the 380 municipal tax jurisdictions in the Province. It has just over 6,000 homes and is 5 kilometers east of the city of Calgary.

1. Canmore – $554,961 –

Canmore is just east of Banff and outside of Banff National Park.  For this reason, it can grow without the same restrictions as inside the park.  Canmore has the 36th highest municipal taxes out of 380 tax jurisdictions in the Province. It has 8,248 homes and is the most expensive place to purchase a house in Alberta on average.

List created by Patrick Bergen of www.Smarttowns.ca

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